Any Book Title Can Be Cool…But Awesome Takes Practice

Recently, Slate posted an article about Hollywood’s latest trend: bad movie titles. Dan Kois, senior editor at Slate, says the recent trend is “lame, SEO-friendly titling,” citing examples like the new film Bad Grandpa by the creators of Jack Ass. The article got me thinking of bad book titles; whole blogs are dedicated to the subject. I took to the internet in search of real books with bad titles, and came up with this list:

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To be fair, most of these book titles actually do sum up the book’s plot or theme, but they also have other, more humorous, meanings that didn’t seem to be thought of by the publisher or author. When thinking of your own book title, it’s best to take out a piece of paper and pen and begin writing down key words or phrases related to the text at hand. Think about the point of the story–what you want readers to get out of it. Once you have a list, start playing with various titles and choose the one you like the best.

And if your best is Games You Can Play with Your Pussy then go with that. Who are we to judge? After all, it got us looking.

-Melanie Figueroa

Melanie Figueroa

Melanie is the Editor in Chief at The Poetics Project. Having earned a masters in writing and book publishing from Portland State University and gained experience as an in-house editor, she now works as a freelance editor and writer. Her favorite book is The Bell Jar. You can follow Melanie on Twitter or Instagram @wellmelsbells.

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