Books that F*** With Your Mind

You know the feeling you get when you hit the last page of a book, and all you can think is “what the f**k just happened?” If you’re like me, you enjoy those books. Here are more books that will totally ‘eff’ with your mind:

 

House of Leaves, by Mark Z. Danielewski

You’ve probably heard of this book even if you’ve not read it because it’s a book people talk about. It’s one of those books (like a few others on this list), which, over the last three or four years can be described as ‘hip.’ I don’t know why; it just is. In summary, this book is about a family moves who into a house on Ash Tree Lane, and it doesn’t take long for them to realize their home is bigger on the inside than on the outside. This book is going to mess with your head.

 

www.alephjournal.wordpress.com

Some pages from inside House of Leaves. It’s rather frightening just by looking at it!
(Credit: slephajournal.wordpress.com)

A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess

Rumor has it the author wrote this book in two weeks. The narrator—a fifteen-year-old boy—tells the story in a sort of made up slang full of words you’ve never heard of, but after a few pages, you don’t even notice that the words are entirely invented, and you somehow understand everything he is saying. The novel explores the meaning of human freedom, and the difference between good and evil.


 

www.danielletson.wordpress.com

This is the version I recently found in my parents garage. It’s from my dad’s teenage years.

Invisible Monsters, by Chuck Palahniuk

Written by the same man who brought us Fight Club, Invisible Monsters is the story of a beautiful model who gets shot in the face. The mystery of who shot her carries on throughout the book, as well as questions of sexuality, identity, and gender. It is written like a movie with flashbacks and flash forwards, and you will probably be confused on more than one occasion, but when you reach that “ah-ha” moment at the end, all confusion is forgiven. It’s Chuck Palahniuk, after all.

www.bookcoverarchive.com

The cover gives absolutely no plot points away, whatsoever.
(Credit: bookcoverarchive.com)

The Consequences Series, by Aleatha Romig

This series is about a woman named Claire who suddenly wakes up in an unfamiliar mansion, living at the mercy of a seemingly (to the public) kind and generous billionaire, Anthony Rawlings. Every review found on the internet will tell you the same thing: this series is mind-blowing, full of unexpected turns, twists, and betrayals. It’s an emotional roller coaster, creating both love and hatred within the reader.

www.mybookmuse.com

I wouldn’t mind waking up in a mansion, but without the emotional roller coaster aspect.
(Credit: mybookmuse.com)

Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn

On the day of Nick and Amy’s fifth wedding anniversary, Amy goes missing. As the story carries on, Nick becomes more and more of a suspect, but there is the constant question of whether he could actually kill his wife. Everyone suspects Nick, who digs himself into a deep hole, but his twin sister stands by his side. You’re going to have to read the book to find out the truth about what happened to Amy!

www.gillian-flynn.com

This is why weddings are always a bad idea.
(Credit: gillian-flynn.com)

Never Let Me Go, by Kazuo Ishiguro

Kathy, Ruth, and Tommy are friends from their childhood growing up at a home called Hailsham. At Hailsham, they were raised to be prepared for the world they would enter – a seemingly normal world to readers. The book is so simplistically mysterious that you won’t even see the twist coming (unless you’ve seen the movie already). The friends separate from one another after life at Hailsham, Ruth and Tommy living together, and Kathy off on her own for many years, but when they all come back together at the age of thirty-one, memories surface from their life at Hailsham that raise questions as to whether Hailsham carried a deep secret they were never to find out.

www.girlslikegiants.wordpress.com

Who doesn’t love a good secret?
(Credit: girlslikegiants.wordpress.com)

Kafka on the Shore, by Haruki Murakami

Kafka is a fifteen-year-old boy who runs away from home, but finds a new home in a public library. There are a lot of weird things within this book, and I’d love to list them, but the list would be quite long and give away too much of the book. It’s a surrealist novel, and that’s pretty recognizable when the fish fall out of the sky. There is a differing of opinion regarding this book, but I think if you open up your mind and allow your imagination to wander, you’ll enjoy it.

www.thevoiceofreason.de

Who needs an acid trip when you have books with fish falling out of the sky?
(Credit: thevoiceofreason.de)

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About Allison Bellows

Allison graduated from California State University at Long Beach in May 2013 with her B.A. in English with an option in Education and an emphasis in Creative Writing. She is currently applying to graduate programs for Social Work. Besides writing for The Poetics Project, she is the social media manager and writer for the monthly newsletter at Makai Coffee in Long Beach, CA. Some of her favorite books are "The Passage" by Justin Cronin, "1984" by George Orwell, and "The Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger.
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