How to Live for 100 Years (To Read Margaret Atwood’s Latest Book)

Dear fellow fans of Margaret Atwood,

We have a problem. It seems that one of our favorite authors has decided that we all need to live, somehow, for the next 100 years to read her next novel, which has been sealed into a time capsule.

So, unless we want to form some kind of Ocean’s Eleven-eque team to break into the vault and take the book to read now (note, if you’re interested in that, we totally are too, but send us an email so we’re not caught conspiring), we’re going to have to instead invest in longevity to be able to read this novel.

First we’ll start with the least insane route to live for the next 100 years:

Taking Care of Yourself

I know—this doesn’t sound fun. We’re all fans of books, not like, vegetables. But, alas, if you want to live for the next 100 years, you’re going to have to stop complaining and start taking care of yourself. Here are <a href="http://www.prevention.com/health/healthy-living/9-s

Amanda Riggle
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Amanda Riggle

Managing Editor at The Poetics Project
Amanda is the Managing Editor at The Poetics Project and of The Socialist, the national magazine of The Socialist Party USA, as well as the Lead Editor of Pomona Valley Review's upcoming 11th issue. She graduated with a BA in English Education and a minor in Political Science. She is currently enrolled in an English MA program with an emphasis in Literature. During her free time, Amanda enjoys writing poetry, reading, traveling, crocheting, watching entire seasons of campy shows on Netflix, and, of course, writing blogs.

You can follow Amanda on Twitter @ThePandaBard, on Pinterest @ThePandaBard, or on Medium @ThePandaBard. You can also find her research on Academia.Edu at Cpp.Academia.Edu/MandaRiggle.

Amanda Riggle
Rarely use

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