From Amora to Zatanna: October

Finally, comic fans, the discussion you have all been waiting for! The Hawkeye Initiative! In the blog I posted two months ago, I discussed the comic art trend dubbed “broken back” women. Many comic artists, typically male artists, have a tendency to illustrate women with anatomically incorrect bodies. The up-to-date tumblr blog known as “Escher Girls” is definitely a page to check out for more discussion about this trend, especially if you’re looking for a particularly overused body trope, such as “helicopter legs” and “serpentine torso.”

From this trend came another, incredibly humorous trend dubbed the Hawkeye Initiative. Before getting into the components, let me try to contextualize this a bit in comic history. It started with the arrival of  the first Avenger’s cinematic poster. In this original promo poster (which is not incredibly hard to find), all the men are facing forward and appear ready for battle, whereas Black Widow, the only woman in the Avenger’s roster at the time, had her back turned towards the camera as she suggestively looks over her shoulder. This was most likely a publicity stunt to infuse the poster with more sexual appeal, and what has more sex appeal the Scarlett Johansson’s bottom?! Naturally, not all comic fans were amused and the promotional poster was quickly changed.

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But from this original poster came the birth of a fantastic trend many of us in the comic community have come to love, and some have even cosplayed! The Hawkeye Initiative began with the character Hawkeye being redrawn in the various suggestive and sexualized poses that his female counterparts are typically drawn in. While Hawkeye is the primary hero placed in these hilarious poses, it has extended out to include the entire Avenger’s cast, plus many heroes from the DC universe.

But on a serious note, why is it that we laugh at these hilarious portrayals of men and not of women? unnamedWhy is it acceptable for a heroine to have her back broken to appear more attractive? These questions have been sparked thanks, in part, to the Hawkeye Initiative and has slowly made the comic community realize the unfair treatment of women characters in comparison to men characters. Perhaps this is also why both DC and Marvel have been looking for more women interested in writing or illustrating comics to jump aboard their creative teams. Now is my chance!

If you want to see more images pertaining to the Hawkeye Initiative, a quick Google search or tumble through Tumblr should yield some hilarious, yet poignant, results. As for me? I’m off to Day 1 of Stan Lee’s Comikaze. Sandman’s Death has entered the building. Until next month!

Nicole Embrey

Nicole is currently an adjunct English instructor at various community colleges. Aspiring to be more than just a teacher, she likes to say she is a "storyteller in training." The stories bouncing around in her head range from a collection of mythical "creature features" to an intensely personal (yet fictional) story about ghosts and clairvoyance. In her spare time, she absorbs anything pop culture, often jumping into new fandoms with reckless abandon. In fact, she is a proud rêveur (which simply means her favorite book is Night Circus).

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