Throwback Thursday: Shakespeare Pickup Lines

Shakespeare isn’t a stranger to love. He’s written about it in a comic sense (Twelfth Night, Much Ado about Nothing, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Tempest), a tragic sense (Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra), and has even inserted love stories into his historic plays (Henry V). It should come as no surprise then, blog reader, that many lines in Shakespeare’s plays can have real life applications of picking up someone you’d like to have relations with. Shakespeare’s characters did it and so can you! Here are some of my favorite Shakespeare pickup lines and how I think they can be applied in real life.

Journeys end in lovers meeting,
Every wise man’s son doth know.
– The Clown, Twelfth Night

This would be a great line to use after last call at a bar. Just go up to your gender of choice and drop this on them, say it’s from Shakespeare, and I’m pretty sure you’ll at least get to second base. At least.

The course of true love never did run smooth.
– Lysander, A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Ever have an awkward first date? Or third? Or…any? Maybe just an awkward first meeting? This line is great for that. If you spill hot soup in your date’s lap or go in for a kiss and instead lick their nose (it happens), this line is a great way to recover from that.

I do love nothing in the world so well as you: is
Not that strange?
– Benedick, Much Ado About Nothing

This wouldn’t work well as a first few dates line, or an initial pick up line, just ‘cause, you know, love is creepy that soon. But this would work well on a long-term partner, maybe after a fight or when he or she is feeling unloved.

Hear my soul speak:
Of the very instant that I saw you, did
My heart fly at your service; there resides,
To make me a slave to it.
– Ferdinand, The Tempest

Oh yeah. This can be used at anytime – ANY. This is great for a first meeting with someone you’re interested in or a long-time lover, whispered in their ear. I love this line.

Sin from thy lips? O trespass sweetly urged!
Give me my sin again.
– Romeo, Romeo and Juliet

Okay, I had to. I could quote almost every line that Romeo says in this play and it’d work as a pickup line, but I especially like this one. This is great after a first kiss, or after just a really really great kiss and would encourage more…uh, kissing we’ll say. More kissing.

You have witchcraft in your lips.
– Henry, Henry V

This is another great line to get a kiss. Shakespeare was all about the ladies and dudes kissin’.

I humbly do beseech of your pardon
For too much loving you.
– Iago, Othello

This is a GREAT line to save face if you offend someone by picking up on them too much. If you’re comin’ on strong, this is a good recovery line.

Finish, good lady; the bright day is done,
And we are for the dark.
– Iras, Antony and Cleopatra

This is a great line to get a lady into the bedroom after a night out, possibly a dinner date or just at last call in a bar.

Throw in your favorite Shakespeare pick-up line and how you’d use it in the comments below – let’s share!

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About ThePandaBard

Amanda is the Managing Editor at The Poetics Project and of The Socialist, the national magazine of The Socialist Party USA. She graduated with a BA in English Education and a minor in Political Science. She is currently enrolled in an English MA program with an emphasis in Literature. During her free time, Amanda enjoys writing poetry, reading, traveling, crocheting, watching entire seasons of campy shows on Netflix, and, of course, writing blogs. You can follow Amanda on Twitter @ThePandaBard, on Pinterest @ThePandaBard, or on Medium @ThePandaBard. You can also find her research on Academia.Edu at Cpp.Academia.Edu/MandaRiggle.
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