10 Male Authors who Bring Sexy to the Paperback

Authors are known for a lot of things–being eccentric, loving cats, even, well, being dicks–but being sexy isn’t usually one of them. For that reason, we at The Poetics Project have decided to shed a little light on all of the sexy male writers out there.

 

1. Rupert Brooke

(Credit: Public Domain)
(Credit: Public Domain)

 
Rupert Brooke was born in 1887. Brooke wrote for most his life; he was known for being quite dashing and befriended people like Winston Churchill and Virginia Woolf, which helped him get his work published and read. When World War I reached England, Brooke enlisted, and in 1915, on an expedition with the Navy, Brooke died of blood poisoning brought on by a mosquito bite. Brooke, the charming, beautiful, young poet became a symbol of the tragic loss of youth brought on by the war.
 

2. James Franco

(Credit: James Franco's Facebook Wall, also know as a Selfie--which he should feel free to post more of)
James Franco’s selfie. Please, post more. (Credit: James Franco’s Facebook Wall)

 
This man needs no introduction. The fact that James Franco is an author at all frustrates many people, but just shut up and look at him.
 

3. William Faulkner

(Credit: Carl Van Vechten)
(Credit: Carl Van Vechten)

 
William Faulkner, although probably better known for pieces like As I Lay Dying, wrote poems almost exclusively for much of his life. He attended Ole Miss (The University of Mississippi) where he was in a fraternity and received a “D” in English. However, several of his poems were published in campus literary journals during this time. He later went on to have a career as a screenwriter, as well as several affairs–one with Joan Williams, who wrote a novel about their time together, called The Wintering.
 

4. Sebastian Junger

(Credit: SebastianJunger.com)
(Credit: SebastianJunger.com)

 
Sebastian Junger’s novel The Perfect Storm was turned into a movie by Warner Bros. Most of Junger’s writing focuses on the outskirts of society and dangerous jobs (hence The Perfect Storm). Junger himself worked as a high-climber removing trees, but after a chainsaw accident, he focused solely on his writing.
 

5. Jack Kerouac

(Credit: Tom Palumbo)
(Credit: Tom Palumbo)

 
Kerouac is a literary icon. In 1969, he passed away from internal bleeding caused by life-long alcohol abuse. Since then, most of his work has been published, continuing to grow in prestige. Personally, I think Kerouac is a bad ass. At six, he had a vision of God telling him that he would struggle in life and suffer a painful death but would experience salvation at the end. In 1943, he began serving time in the Navy, but was dismissed after only eight days. The medical examiner who sent him away diagnosed Kerouac with dementia praecox–essentially madness–and quoted Kerouac as saying “I just can’t stand it; I like to be myself.”
 

6. Isaac Marion

(Credit: IsaacMarion.com)
(Credit: IsaacMarion.com)

 
Isaac Marion wrote the novel Warm Bodies, which was also turned into a movie by the same name. Marion decide to skip college in order to gain real-world experience. He self-published several other novels before Atria picked up Warm Bodies. He also writes music and has a digital album called Dead Children available for download.
 

7. Yann Martel

(Credit: CanLit is Sexy)
(Credit: CanLit is Sexy)

 
Yann Martel wrote Life of Pi, so maybe that tiger reference is starting to make sense to some people. He is also Mr. December in the 2014 Bare it for Books calendar, in which, you guessed it, he bares it all for books.
 

8. Chuck Palahniuk

(Credit: Sarah Lee)
(Credit: Sarah Lee)

 
Chuck Palahniuk wrote Fight Club among other things. He has a house in Portland, and I met a doctor on a recent trip home to California who is supposedly friends with the writer. He gave me his card. I’ve decided not to call him, however, because I also don’t want to die anytime soon because I was being “that girl.” If Palahniuk’s writing is disturbing to you, it should be. He sent Fight Club to a publisher who had rejected his novel Invisible Monsters for being “too disturbing” in the hopes that Fight Club would disturb him even more. Cause, you know, that’s an appropriate response to rejection. I probably wouldn’t suggest that method to most aspiring writers.
 

9. Nicholas Sparks

(Credit: Nina Subin)
(Credit: Nina Subin)

 
Okay. I had to throw Nicholas Sparks in here. After all, the man wrote The Notebook. Enough said. Plus, my mom really has a thing for him.
 

10. Oscar Wilde

(Credit: Public Domain)
(Credit: Public Domain)

 
Oscar Wilde led a tragic life, which you can read about here. I don’t know if “hot” is the write word to describe Wilde. He’s simply beautiful, and his writing was too.

Who would you add to the list?

-Melanie Figueroa

Melanie Figueroa

Melanie is the Editor-in-Chief at The Poetics Project. She has a masters in writing and book publishing from Portland State University and a passion for stories in all their forms. Her favorite book is The Bell Jar. You can follow Melanie on Twitter or Instagram @wellmelsbells.

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      melanienicholefigueroa

      Haha. If only I could get my hands on their topless photos. Too bad at least two of them, including Chuck, bat for the other team. *sigh*

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