Amanda Riggle

Amanda is the Managing Editor at The Poetics Project and of The Socialist, the national magazine of The Socialist Party USA, as well as the Lead Editor of Pomona Valley Review's upcoming 11th issue. She graduated with a BA in English Education and a minor in Political Science. She is currently enrolled in an English MA program with an emphasis in Literature. During her free time, Amanda enjoys writing poetry, reading, traveling, crocheting, watching entire seasons of campy shows on Netflix, and, of course, writing blogs.

Amanda is the Managing Editor at The Poetics Project and of The Socialist, the national magazine of The Socialist Party USA, as well as the Lead Editor of Pomona Valley Review's upcoming 11th issue. She graduated with a BA in English Education and a minor in Political Science. She is currently enrolled in an English MA program with an emphasis in Literature. During her free time, Amanda enjoys writing poetry, reading, traveling, crocheting, watching entire seasons of campy shows on Netflix, and, of course, writing blogs.

Amanda Riggle Author Profile

IMG_0206Published Poet Profile: Amanda Riggle

Interview by: Melanie Figueroa

Amanda is a student at Cal Poly Pomona, a tutor, and an editor at The Poetics Project. While Amanda’s goal is to become a teacher, she also writes poems and short stories. On April 26th, one of Amanda’s poems will be published in the Pomona Valley Review Literary Journal. For more information about the journal, visit their website www.pomonavalleyreview.com. Below is an interview I was fortunate enough to be have with Amanda about what it’s like to be published, her writing process, and, of course, poetry.

The Poetics Project: Amanda, you wrote this poem in response to a workshop for The Poetics Project. Can you please tell us a little about that assignment and how your piece was influenced by it?

Amanda: Before the website was launched, we had a small Facebook group in which we critiqued each other’s writing and had creative writing projects with a deadline for the work to be shared.  The assignment my poem was in response to had two requirements – one, that it be about childhood and two, that it fit with Russian formalist critic Victor Shklovsky’s view of art in that it takes a look at the mundane and transforms the familiar by describing it in unfamiliar terms so that the reader takes a look at the mundane subject and sees a new thing in it they hadn’t recognized before. My response to that prompt was to take the opposite view of childhood that society generally holds – that it is not something precious, unique, and priceless and, in fact, is something that everyone has, good, bad, or in-between.

Amanda Got a Shakespeare Tattoo

Lo and behold, I said in my biography that I like tattoos, and here I have a post about my latest tattoo and first Shakespeare tattoo.

The sketch that would become my tattoo.
The sketch that would become my tattoo.

I guess the question is where did this quote come from? It’s from Othello, my favorite Shakespeare tragedy. The specific speaker of these lines is Iago, one of the most sinister and clever villains written by Shakespeare. The thing about Iago is that, by all appearances, he is a trustworthy man who has fought by Othello’s side in battles and has saved Othello’s life on multiple occasions. Everyone has reason to trust Iago, the lower class man who has risen as far as he can within the ranks of his society and is angry that, while he is stuck at his station, Othello, an outsider, can advance and marry well above Iago’s station. Iago’s sharp mind, golden tongue, and honest appearance bring down ruin on the others of the play.

I Kind Of Like to be Profane

Profanity is supposed to be offensive, I get that, but there are times when the word shit just works so perfectly that a PG substitution won’t quite do.

You know when you stub your toe on something? Shit! Shit just works so beautifully to express the pain, surprise, and anger all balled into one, four letter word. Saying shoot just doesn’t have the same impact, not in real life and not in a poem. Shit conveys a very real emotion that cannot be replaced by one word alone.

My Writing Process

I’m a somewhat frantic writer. I never find a quiet space to write, but honestly, when silence occurs, I do find that my writing comes easier.

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I’m too busy to look for that quiet spot, though, so I write on the go. I always carry a notebook with me and I jot down ideas. I always write down little lines or funny things I hear that I might think I can transform into a poem or short story later.

I buy those 99 cent composition notebooks and I doodle in them. I have two or three in my backpack at a time because I use them for different subjects – academic paper ideas, poetry ideas, and short story ideas.

Annual Shakespeare Conference at The University of La Verne in California.

Do you like Shakespeare?

Do you like me?

Do you like going places and hearing people, specifically me, talk about Shakespeare?

Even if you said no to any of those (which you wouldn’t, because you are awesome, right?) you can still check out this link to the Shakespeare Conference I am presenting at on April 27th, 2013 held at the University of La Verne.

My presentation title is Portia on a Pedestal – An Exploration of the Modern Media’s Portrayal of Women and my abstract is as follows:

The modern media portrays the perfect woman as a female that embodies desirable feminine traits alongside positive male traits. The way the media, such as film and television, portrays the perfect sexual object isn’t a new one, for Portia from Merchant of Venice embodies the same characteristics of desirable feminine qualities while also displaying positive masculine qualities which she dons when she changes into male clothing that are also present at other points within the play. The idea that a desirable woman is flawless in both her feminine charms and within the masculine charms she possess transcends Shakespeare’s time and penetrates modern western society as well. This paper shall analyze Portia’s display of feminine traits while in feminine clothing and masculine traits exhibited by cross-dressing and compare them to modern film’s heroines and display of both feminine and masculine traits and what this says, overall, about an unchanged idea of the media’s perfect woman.

For more information, visit the University of La Verne’s Shakespeare Conference webpage or contact the Director of the event, Jeffrey Kahan. Jeffrey Kahan has a Ph.D. is Shakespeare Studies from the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon. He is the author of Reforging Shakespeare, The Cult of Kean, Bettymania and the Birth of Celebrity Culture, and Shakespiritualism. He can be reached at shakespearecenter@laverne.edu.

I hope to see you all there!

Dan Hogan Author Profile

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Dan Hogan and wife, Sophie Mae

Published Poet Profile: Dan Hogan
Interview by: Amanda Riggle

Dan Hogan is a part-time English teacher at Cal State Fullerton, Irvine Valley College, and Norco College. In addition to being an amazing teacher, Dan has recently had his work published in Cal State Fullerton’s literary journal DASH – due out in May of 2013. His original haiku was about a double-parking incident and will be available for everyone to read once DASH releases their current issue. For more info on DASH, visit their website WWW.DashLiteraryJournal.Com. We had the pleasure to interview Dan via-email and below is what he had to say. He’s a smart man, talented man, so you should totally read this and be inspired.

The Poetics Project: Dan, what inspired you to write this piece? Did someone double park next to you and block you in?

Dan: I live at an apartment complex with two really narrow spots right next to the dumpster. I work so late that often those are the two spaces that are open. Most of the time, people with their gargantuan sport utility vehicles can’t fit in the spots, and it’s kind of an art to squeeze in there. But sometimes people just give up and park across both spots. Or worse, they park with one tire into the other spot making it impossible to park there. Such a pain. The nearest spot from there is about two hundred yards away, and at 1 am after grading all night at a coffee shop, it’s a real pain. So I wrote it one night because I always feel like writing notes and leaving them on the windshield, but this time I didn’t.

The First Poems of Famous Writers

Below are some of our favorite writers and their very first poems ever written. What do you think? Which are your favorite? Can you see where their style started from? Do these poems inspire you? Let us know in the comments below!

William Shakespeare

“Untitled” (1582) (1 year before he had a poem published)

Those lips that Love’s own hand did make
Breath’d forth the sound that said I hate
To me that languish’d for her sake:
But when she saw my woeful state,
Straight in her heart did mercy come.
Chiding that tongue, that ever sweet
Was used in giving gentle doom:
And taught it thus anew to greet:
‘I hate’ she alter’d with an end
That follow’d it as gentle day
Doth follow night, who like a fiend
From heaven to hell is flown away.
‘I hate’ from hate away she threw,
And sav’d my life, saying ‘not you’

Tamara Trujillo’s Summer Creative Writing Class at Fullerton College

Tamara Trujillo is offering, for the second time ever in Fullerton College’s history, a Creative Writing course over the summer session. What makes her qualified to teach such a course? Not only is she a professor at Fullerton College, but she is also a published author. Much of Tamara’s poetry has been published and we are lucky enough to have one of her unpublished poems to share with you today.

Homemade

Most nights, the sewing machine whirred from my parents’ room next door, mother obsessed with perfection. It was a tedious process: pairing our hopes in the shape of a pattern, selecting fabric for the thin paper frame, lining up seams, rethreading the machine, hours of holding still under the delicate prick of the needle. In the sleepy evening, I would stand in front of her long mirror as she pinned the flimsy outline around my form, tracing my body with her long, natural nails. She would sit with her tanned, slim legs tucked under her as she hemmed pant cuffs that flared at the end, or ankle-length dresses with bibbed fronts. If I looked down at her as she worked, I could lose myself in the crown of her expertly-coiffed beehive, swirls of brown floating me closer towards something like love but never reaching anything that ever actually fit.

April: National Poetry Month

Did you know that April is National Poetry Month? April isn’t just a month for appreciating poetry; it’s also about writing poetry.

I know, you have work.

School. Totally understandable.

A life? Yeah, we all have that too.

But this is April; this month was made for poetry, so put your excuses aside and write. Write anything. It doesn’t have to be perfect – it just has to come from you.

April Poetry Workshop

Hello new blog users. I know you’re all new, not just because I’m awesome and have magical powers, but because this is a new blog so you all must be new. See what I did there? Logic, it’s fun.

Since everyone is new, I’m going to break down how these monthly assignments work. I give you an assignment; you do the assignment. It’s pretty simple.

Joking aside, there will be multiple levels to each assignment. Most assignments will have a base, intermediate and advanced level posted. To participate, you merely have to work on the base level. If you are looking to challenge yourself, I post the intermediate and advanced levels for you to work with.

At the end of the month, I will pick 3-5 of the best poems submitted and post them with the rationale behind why I picked those particular poems. The level of assignment does not come into play in the picking; meaning an advanced poem will not be picked over a base poem if I feel the base poem was executed better.

Once your poem is completed, click Submit Piece Here on the blog’s menu bar to be taken to a submission form. Please include a little something about yourself in the additional information section of the form.