Poetry

Movie Haikus

Buzzfeed ran a cute listicle (list+article, emphasis on the list part) turning Disney movies into haikus. We all found it pretty amusing:

(Credit: Buzzfeed)
(Credit: Buzzfeed)
(Credit: Buzzfeed)

I liked these so much I figured I’d making a writing exercise based off of this article—I was going to turn other movies I liked into funny haikus.

You see, this week I’m going to revise and edit some of my own poetry and submit it for publication. I know that writing these haikus will help warm up my creative bone, and I plan on having fun with it all at the same time. In my book, warming up and having fun at the same time is a win-win.

Haikus are a great poetic form to warm up with. They have a controlled meter that force the writer to not only think of syllabic count, but to be extra careful when selecting words. Each word used in a poem adds meaning and counts towards the overall message/theme of the poem, but this is especially true with a haiku where there are so few words, a writer really can’t spare any.

Without further ado, here are some movies I made into haikus:

Star Wars:

In a galaxy
Far, far away. Incest and
You know, clones and stuff.

Found Poems, Take 2

One of my classes this quarter requires a creative element for our final, so I decided to do some found poetry. The book that I took the poems from is called So Long a Letter by Mariama Bâ. It was hard to do this project because I really liked the book and what I wanted to do ripped the book apart, literally, to appropriate her words and pages to create a new thing.

This is what my final poems looked like:

Found Poem #1

 

Found Poem #2

I have to say, despite ripping apart a book with my bare hands and the pain it caused me as an English major, this was a really fun project, and I really like the poems that I found within the text. I used stamps, glue, colored pencils, a razor, and of course, my secret talent of crocheting (I made the pink elephant head) for the final project.

I Would Totally Take my Panties off For The Right Poem, Part 1

You read the title right. Today I’m exploring the use of poetry as seductive tool. So anyone who has had a British Lit class or has taken a Poetry course of some sort will be familiar with The Flea by John Donne.

Mark but this flea, and mark in this,
How little that which thou deniest me is;
It sucked me first, and now sucks thee,
And in this flea our two bloods mingled be;
Thou know’st that this cannot be said
A sin, nor shame, nor loss of maidenhead,
Yet this enjoys before it woo,
And pampered swells with one blood made of two,
And this, alas, is more than we would do.

Oh stay, three lives in one flea spare,
Where we almost, nay more than married are.
This flea is you and I, and this
Our mariage bed, and marriage temple is;
Though parents grudge, and you, w’are met,
And cloistered in these living walls of jet.
Though use make you apt to kill me,
Let not to that, self-murder added be,
And sacrilege, three sins in killing three.

Cruel and sudden, hast thou since
Purpled thy nail, in blood of innocence?
Wherein could this flea guilty be,
Except in that drop which it sucked from thee?
Yet thou triumph’st, and say’st that thou
Find’st not thy self, nor me the weaker now;
’Tis true; then learn how false, fears be:
Just so much honor, when thou yield’st to me,
Will waste, as this flea’s death took life from thee.

The Curious Relationship Between Writers and Cats

Writers have been said to be solitary beings, which may provide insight into why so many writers seem to choose cats as their companions, rather than man’s best friend. Cats aren’t pack animals, meaning they don’t feel the need to do what anyone else wants them to do. And they have large, peculiar personalities, which can also be said of writers.

When I began researching this curious relationship between writers and cats, I stumbled upon a poem written by William Carlos Williams:

As the Cat

As the cat
climbed over
the top of

the jamcloset
first the right
forefoot

carefully
then the hind
stepped down

into the pit of
the empty
flowerpot

The First Poems of Famous Writers

Below are some of our favorite writers and their very first poems ever written. What do you think? Which are your favorite? Can you see where their style started from? Do these poems inspire you? Let us know in the comments below!

William Shakespeare

“Untitled” (1582) (1 year before he had a poem published)

Those lips that Love’s own hand did make
Breath’d forth the sound that said I hate
To me that languish’d for her sake:
But when she saw my woeful state,
Straight in her heart did mercy come.
Chiding that tongue, that ever sweet
Was used in giving gentle doom:
And taught it thus anew to greet:
‘I hate’ she alter’d with an end
That follow’d it as gentle day
Doth follow night, who like a fiend
From heaven to hell is flown away.
‘I hate’ from hate away she threw,
And sav’d my life, saying ‘not you’

April Poetry Workshop

Hello new blog users. I know you’re all new, not just because I’m awesome and have magical powers, but because this is a new blog so you all must be new. See what I did there? Logic, it’s fun.

Since everyone is new, I’m going to break down how these monthly assignments work. I give you an assignment; you do the assignment. It’s pretty simple.

Joking aside, there will be multiple levels to each assignment. Most assignments will have a base, intermediate and advanced level posted. To participate, you merely have to work on the base level. If you are looking to challenge yourself, I post the intermediate and advanced levels for you to work with.

At the end of the month, I will pick 3-5 of the best poems submitted and post them with the rationale behind why I picked those particular poems. The level of assignment does not come into play in the picking; meaning an advanced poem will not be picked over a base poem if I feel the base poem was executed better.

Once your poem is completed, click Submit Piece Here on the blog’s menu bar to be taken to a submission form. Please include a little something about yourself in the additional information section of the form.

March Poetry Workshop

March Poetry Workshop Assignment

Base assignment: write a poem, any form, about the future.

Intermediate assignment: in addition to the base assignment, three key words must be incorporated into the piece: mob, sand, and book (these are the first three words that came up in a random noun generator, if anyone was curious where I got these from).

Advanced assignment: in addition to the base and intermediate assignment, restricted to the form of rhyme royal poem. A rhyme royal poem is a 7 line poem in iambic pentameter with the rhyme scheme of a-b-a-b-b-c-c. An example:

Opening to Thomas Wyatt’s rhyme royal poem:
They flee from me that sometime did me seek
With naked foot, stalking in my chamber.
I have seen them gentle, tame, and meek,
That now are wild and do not remember
That sometime they put themself in danger
To take bread at my hand; and now they range,
Busily seeking with a continual change.