Alan Rickman Reads

When I read, I don’t hear my own voice in my head. Generally, I’ll hear someone with a British accent. Why? Because I like the way it sounds.

And, after watching some of my favorite movies like Sense and Sensibility or, you know, any Harry Potter film, I get Alan Rickman’s voice stuck in my head. For about a week on out, his voice echoes in my head as the voice of every play, poem, and novel I read.

And now I’m going to get Alan Rickman’s voice stuck in your head too. Youtube – beautiful, wonderful Youtube, has entire playlists of Alan Rickman just reading stuff, like poems and excerpts from novels and plays. My favorite reading, because the only thing I love more than Alan Rickman’s voice is Shakespeare’s works, is Alan Rickman’s reading of Sonnet 130.

Huh?

Language is an interesting thing, isn’t it? Let’s take a look at a few words in different languages and compare the differences.

English Word: Yes

(Credit: Obeygiant.com)

 

French Word: Oui
Spanish Word: Sí
Arabic: نعم
Chinese (Simplified Han): 是
German: Ja
Russian: да

Now let’s try another word.

English Word: Huh

Source: FanPop.Com
(Credit: Fanpop.Com)

 

French Word: Huh
Spanish Word: Huh
Arabic: Huh
Chinese (Simplified Han): Huh
German: Huh
Russian: Huh

Wait–is that a universal word? Yup. Huh seems to be cross-cultural and the one word that everyone, in every language, understands.

Writing Goals: Poetry Addition

April was National Poetry Month. So, of course, on my Facebook page, I posted a poem or two a day. And, inspired by all the poetry I was posting, I tried to write more poems than I usually do.

Now that April’s over, I want to continue pushing myself to write poetry. I’ve written in the past how deadlines work really well for me when it comes to writing, but how arbitrary ones, not attached to a literary journal’s deadline, kinda never seem to have the same effect on my writing.

My new goal is to write two poems a week. Is that doable? Maybe. I’m older and more mature now, so maybe I’ll be able to hold myself to my writing goals. But there are a few other tricks I’m using to motivate myself to keep my writing goals.

First and foremost, I’m telling all of you about my goal. When other people, like my co-blogger Melanie, know about my goals and can ask me about them, I tend to do better at holding myself accountable for my goals. So I’ve told her, and you, that I plan on writing two poems a week and now there’s an expectation that I will be writing two poems a week.

Don’t Judge An Adaptation By The Book

People always say the book was better. It’s ironed onto t-shirts on Etsy and plastered all over Pinterest. Anthropomorphized novels are urging you to buy and read them before you decide to see their cinematic counterparts acted out on the big screen.

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We get it (really, that face says it all) because it’s a slippery slope and if people stop reading then maybe people will stop writing. I struggle, personally, because I really love both mediums—in some ways equally, although for different reasons.

The amount of film—both television and movies—out there that originated from literary works is pretty astounding, but the truth is, sometimes the book isn’t better. And that’s not (always) a bad thing.

That’s probably because literary adaptations aren’t meant to inspire the reader, they’re meant to inspire the director. We simply get to enjoy the fruits of their labor and vision.

Below are just a few adaptations that, perhaps, prove the book isn’t always better. Sometimes it’s just different.

Game of Thrones

Even book purists have admitted that while Martin’s books are packed full of history and some pretty amazing characters and plot lines, the HBO show has, quite possibly, done a better job at telling this story. While the show has made slight changes from the start, Season 5 is going far, far off the books, changing the story lines of some characters completely and ditching new characters that appear later in Martin’s series.

SPOILER ALERT! Sansa’s story, for instance, has been changed drastically. Instead of wandering through the Vale with her cousin, she is off to Winterfell. In the books, Jeyne Poole’s character (who we’ll never meet) travels to Sansa’s former home instead.

But these changes make the show arguably less “boring” for viewers and help push the story forward. With a cast list that’s already quite lengthy, the show expects a lot from viewers with increasingly busy lives (they’re doing us a favor, really). And because the characters from the book—even the ones who are cut—are still serving as the inspiration, book readers may come to appreciate the changes. Some already have.

Stand By Me

This movie was an instant classic—four boys walking the railroad tracks in search of the body of a missing boy. Yet, the story was originally contained within the pages of Stephen King’s short story “The Body,” a story that isn’t as frequently associated with King’s name as, say, Carrie or The Shining.

It’s a 1986 coming-of-age story, but the film has a timeless quality with some amazing performances. Incidentally, “The Body” was in King’s anthology Different Seasons which also contained “The Shawshank Redemption” (an equally stellar adaptation).

Drive

Drive, the movie, is based on the 2005 book Drive by James Sallis. The film takes advantage of the medium, letting meaningful looks and long silences do the talking instead of dialogue. Minor characters in the novel, like Shannon and Irene (Driver’s love interest), are given larger roles in the film, and these characters help provide more depth and connection to the events that unfold.

Plus, there’s Ryan Gosling. Need I say more?

Mean Girls

Mean Girls was a staple of my teenage years. It demonstrates how cut throat teenage girls can be to each other, while helping women laugh at it all a bit. Originally though, Mean Girls wasn’t Mean Girls at all, it was Queen Bees and Wannabees: Helping Your Daughter Survive Cliques, Gossip, Boyfriends, and the New Realities of Girl World, a book written by Rosalind Wiseman to help parents understand their daughter’s friendships and conflict.

Tina Fey turned it into comic genius (yes, I’m going that far).

“I want my pink shirt back!”

Game of Thrones: Is Going Off Book Going to Ruin The Ending?

Everyone’s favorite adaptation is five episodes in and running out of source material. This season, as everyone is well aware of, the show is going to go off in its own direction and go off-book.


 
While the series is very loosely based on the War of the Roses which started in England around 1455 with the House of Plantagenet and the houses of Lancaster and York claiming rights to the throne of England, it’s hard to say that the books are supposed to have the same ending as the history they are based off of. So how can the show creators go off script if they aren’t sure how the book series is supposed to end?

Well, G.R.R. Martin told the show’s creators the ending he has in mind. This is where the problem arises—at least in my mind. If the creators know the ending and G.R.R. Martin hasn’t yet written the character’s paths to that point, the show gets to do the path-forging. This in itself isn’t bad, but what happens if G.R.R. Martin and the show create two different paths for the same ending?

Damn, Poetry’s Hard

In Adam Frank’s recent article on NPR, the writer compares poetry to physics. He begins his discussion with T.S. Eliot’s Wasteland, which is 434 lines. In other words, it’s long. For some readers, that length provides something to hold onto a bit longer. An author might claim that more space allows for them to create greater meaning. But for some readers, longer poems can be daunting.

However, length isn’t the only thing that makes certain poems more difficult for some than others. Why someone may not “get” a poem can be for many reasons. In Frank’s article, the writer interviews John Beer, poet and professor at Portland State University. Beer had this to say about the subject:

There are, it seems, as many ways for a poem to be difficult as there are for it to be a poem at all. For most people, a lot of poetry written before the twentieth century will be a challenge: the vocabulary will often be unfamiliar, the syntax may be more complicated than we are accustomed to reading, and allusions, especially to classical learning, abound.

The “Harry Potter” Fan Theory That Changed Nothing

Where there are fandoms, there are fan theories. The Harry Potter world has a ton of them. The latest to gain attention is that the Dursleys were not just mean to Harry because they were bad people, but because they were under the affect of a Horcrux.

Specifically, they were under the affect of Harry, who is himself a Horcrux. Remember?

The theory started on Tumblr—because where else—where Graphic Nerdity wrote that the Dursleys were ordinary, perfectly respectable people before Harry was dropped off on their doorstep. She continues, “For the next decade it proceeded to warp their minds…The fact that they survived such prolonged horcrux exposure without delving into insanity or abandoning a helpless child only solidifies their place among the pantheon of noble and virtuous heroes in the Harry Potter universe.”

And, I suppose, on the surface the theory makes sense. Both Ron and Ginny become possessed when exposed to a Horcrux for a long period of time—Ron with the Slytherin locket and Ginny with Tom Riddle’s diary. The wizarding world had long since been surprised by the Dursley’s complete lack of familial love for Harry.

All this to say, yes, I felt it too. Reading the books, especially as a child myself, I wanted to understand the sort of people who’d keep a little boy in a closet under the stairs.

But while the Harry Potter universe does have a “pantheon of noble and virtuous heroes,” I don’t think the Dursleys are among them. Nor were they meant to be. Sometimes bad people just have to exist.

The universe Rowling created also has many evils, and while most of those belong to the magical world, there are plenty of evils that are very much human.

2015: A Moviegoers Guide to Book-Based Movies in May and June

Rejoice movie and book lovers! May and June are filled with great books-turned movies for you to read then watch, or watch then read.


On May 1st, Far From the Madding Crowd

Bathsheba Everdene has three men fall in love with her within this novel by Tomas Hardy – a devoted shepherd, an obsessed farmer, and a dashing solider. Who does this strong minded heroine choose? You’ll have to read the book or watch the movie to find out.


On May 15th, Every Secret Thing

Birthday parties are supposed to be fun, but Alice Manning and Ronnie Fuller find an abandoned baby after being kicked out of the birthday party. What follows leaves three families devastated. Alice and Ronnie, seven years later, try to continue on with their lives but can’t leave the past behind them, especially when another child goes missing. Laura Lippman’s novel explores innocence, guilt, love, redemption, and murder in this tale of mystery and suspense.

Literary Paraphernalia: All Things Shakespeare

This month we’ve done lots of Literary Paraphernalia posts featuring Shakespeare-related goods. This Friday we’re continuing that trend with a pretty cool collection of awesome things from Etsy.Com – from bags to tea to, well, there’s a hamster in there too. I’m not really sure what to classify that hamster as, except really damn adorable.


Shakespearean Insult Mosaic

You never know when you’ll need a handy-dandy Shakespearean insult at your disposal, and this mosaic is here to help you remember them.

William Shakespeare Cookie Cutter

What better way to show your adoration for Shakespeare than to eat his face in the form of a cookie?

Shakespeare Pillow

I think this item is supposed to be for children, but I would totally cuddle with it still.

Hamlet Hamster

I can’t think of one damn functional purpose for this thing, except that it’s ultra adorable and that I want one for my desk.

Story Shots: Shakespeare

Story_Shots

Today, in 1616, William Shakespeare, beloved playwright and poet, passed away. For the past 399 years, Shakespeare has continued to live through his work. An author, you see, can die twice. Once is his or her actual, physical death, and the second death is when no one reads nor remembers your work any longer. While Shakespeare has died once, he has yet to experience this second death. This blog isn’t about Shakespeare’s death, but rather is about his continued life through his works.


Sonnet 74

But be contented when that fell arrest
Without all bail shall carry me away,
My life hath in this line some interest,
Which for memorial still with thee shall stay.
When thou reviewest this, thou dost review
The very part was consecrate to thee:
The earth can have but earth, which is his due;
My spirit is thine, the better part of me:
So then thou hast but lost the dregs of life,
The prey of worms, my body being dead;
The coward conquest of a wretch’s knife,
Too base of thee to be remembered.
The worth of that is that which it contains,
And that is this, and this with thee remains.

– William Shakespeare


I am a rumor – a story. I just happen to be true.

I started one day in a Shakespeare course at Cal Poly Pomona.

They were paired up – the brightest and most talkative girl in the class – big in size and personality. And he was the handsome, fit, and quiet boy – quiet because he slept through most of the class.

He had all of the lines, literally. He was Henry V and she was Catherine – his French speaking princess. Only, she didn’t speak French. But Catherine did in eight lines of the scene they were assigned.

Henry V had issues remembering his long-winded speeches. It might have been because they were so long. It was most likely because he had put off practicing them until the day of the scene.

Catherine had issues remembering how to say things in French. She tried to write the lines down on her hand, but she realized she also had issues reading French. French, overall, was the issue for the princess of France.

Henry V and Catherine, while never having practiced the scene completely through together, did have one agreement though – they would end their production of Henry V right before Henry’s line “Catherine, you have witchcraft in your lips.”

Catherine was happy with that plan. Henry V had a surprise.

This is where the rumor was born. This was how I was made.

Henry V pulled the teacher aside before class and begged to use his copy of Shakespeare’s play to remember his words.

Catherine declined and tried to read her horribly scribbled French lines off of her hand.

Henry V and Catherine both forgot about Catherine’s maid, Alice. An Alice was pulled out of the audience and stuck into the scene.

Alice didn’t know her words either nor any of the staging. She assumed there would be staging. Henry V and Catherine never really got that far.

Alice was standing between Catherine and Henry when the dreaded line was said “Catherine, you have witchcraft in your lips.”

Catherine’s eyes opened wide and a slight look of horror swept across her face as Henry pushed aside Alice and took Catherine in his arms.

Henry V pulled Catherine close. His hand touched her cheek.

His thumb found itself over her lips, so when his lips approached, they were both kissing his thumb.

The class gasped.

Catherine exhaled.

Henry V thought himself clever.

Overall, the performance was awful. The Bard was probably rolling over in his grave.

The teacher gave Henry V and Catherine a solid B.

And now everyone remembers me as that time that one girl got kissed in Dr. Aaron’s Shakespeare class.

– Amanda Riggle