Tag Archives: Black Cat

From Amora to Zatanna: Convention Round-Up #1

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Guess what comic junkies? I was fortunate enough to attend the San Diego Comicon for a couple of days (thanks Neo!) and, man, was that an experience!
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I was in the same vicinity as some of my favorite entertainers and creators… and spent entirely too much money. But hey! My bad money-spending habit is your reward; here are some titles I picked up while walking the ever seductive floor of vendors:

Invictus by Antonio Ramirez with art by Neil Dmonte & Jason Walton:

This is a comic from a smaller publishing house and I was fortunate enough to meet the writer at this booth. This 3 part series follows the adventures of Alex Archer, otherwise known as the shadow-bender Invictus. Shadow-benders have the ability to blend in with and manipulate the darkness of the shadows, which leads Alex to wonder “should my powers be used for good… or bad?” With the impending apocalypse, he better make his decision. And quick!

Templar by Jon Simon & Paul Mendoza with art by Neil Dmonte & Paul Mendoza:

“Evil Thrives When Good Men Do Nothing.” This comic, which I believe is independently published, comes from another writer I was fortunate enough to meet at the same booth as Antonio. A historical fiction, Jon was motivated to write this comic as a result of his love for history. This love developed from the close bond he shares with his father, who was a history teacher. Taking the most interesting factoids from history and fusing them with magical and mythical elements, Jon manages to create an entertaining story of knightly obstacles and triumphs.

Clan of the Vein by Neo Edmund & Neil Dmonte with art also by Neil Dmonte & Jason Walton:

Neil was the last person I met at this booth of talented people and was the artist for all the previous comics I listed. While Neo was not at the booth during this time, he is a close friend of mine and the reason I was able to check out Comicon this year (again, thank you!). Together they tackle the vampiric folklore through Ian MacBane, which they describe on their Facebook as “– a legendary vampire killer. MacBane finds himself in a remote mountain resort under siege by a clan of vicious vampires who have taken the guests hostages. He learns that the vamps are seeking the hidden location of the blood of the last vampire queen, but he has no idea that the secret is locked away in his own lost memories — and his enemies will stop at nothing to force him to remember.” You might also recognize some of this artwork on the walls of Stile’s bedroom in MTV’s Teen Wolf.

Womanthology by an assortment of women writers and artists at IDW:

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This is a truly unique comic of separate, yet thematic, vignettes completely written and illustrated by women in the comic business. Believe it or not, the comic community still has its reservations (and trolly rants) about women writers and artists, which makes the market for someone like myself a difficult place to enter into. But things are getting better, as the existence of this comic illustrates. Slowly but surely, more and more people want to read stories and see art by women!
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From Amora to Zatanna: August

From Amora to Zatanna: July Our monthly run down on the comic book world, by our very own Nicole Neitzke.

Well there you have it comic fans! I give kudos to the almighty Marvel and they release the controversial image by the Italian erotica illustrator, Milo Manara, of Spider Woman in a highly suggestive pose. This image is an alternate cover to the newly rebooted “Spider Woman #1” comic franchise and man, did it piss off comic fans! This is just another example of a continuing discussion in the comic community: super heroines are over-sexualized! However, I’m not going to re-hash the same conversation I’m sure many of us have already read regarding this image and topic. Instead, I decided to dedicate this blog to some light hearted japery directed at the comic community. I had it recently brought to my attention by an artist friend just how inaccurate the physiology of these super heroines are, so I decided to post images about a current artistic trend feminists have lovingly called “the broken back.”

This trend is two-fold: it can either relate to a women who are illustrated with not only their full face and bust visible, but both butt cheeks as well; or it can be related to the exaggerated bust to hip disproportions, which hints at back problems due to the weight. This isn’t to say that these body shapes are not possible, mind you, just that our suspension of disbelief for a world populated by these types of woman almost exclusively is stretching it. Without further ado, “the broken back.”

Starting with DC, Catwoman
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