Tag Archives: Macbeth

400 Years After Shakespeare’s Death

The Cobbe Portrait, William Shakespeare

On April 23rd, 1616, it is believed that William Shakespeare passed away. While we don’t have records of his death, we do have records of his funeral which occurred two days later on April 25th, 1616.

At the age of 52, Shakespeare left behind a body of work that has captivated pop culture and has been the favored subject of academia (think of your high school literature classes) for the past 400 years. Shakespeare’s works have lead to an unparalleled phenomenon across cultures and well past his time.

This blog has continually looked for Shakespeare from searching for Shakespeare in bookstores in Taipei, Taiwan to visiting a bookstore with his namesake in Berkeley, California. Speaking of books, we’ve reviewed the Star Wars Shakespeare-style books, have shared our own stories about Shakespeare, and have made so many freaking posts about Shakespeare loot it’s kinda ridiculous.

Literary Paraphernalia: Shakespeare Home Decor

To continue with our celebration of The Swan of Avon, I’ve found some really cool items to turn your ordinary, 21st century home into a Shakespeare extravaganza. It’s not quiet like The Globe, but hey, what in life is like The Globe?

Hamlet Mixed Media Print

Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio, a fellow of infinite nest, of most excellent fancy bird hats.

Lady Macbeth Soap Dispenser

You too can feel like a murderess cleaning her hands of her sins every time you go to wash your hands.

The Tempest Poster

Take a leap and stick this bold poster inspired by The Tempest up on your wall and see what devils come to play in your life.

As You Like It Stained Glass

This stained glass quote would look cool in any window or hanging out in a garden – wherever you may like it.

English Teacher + Infant = Literary Photo Shoot

I love being an English teacher. I get to read great books with great kids all day for the entire year. I also love being a father. I get to raise a human being, teach him how to throw a baseball, and introduce him to the Star Wars films. This is a wonderful life.

This summer, life got even sweeter. It was my first as a father. Rather than get to my to-do list items as I normally do during summers, I decided to distract myself with a father-son project. With the help of my eight month old son Gabriel, we recreated some cover art from a few great pieces of literature. So, in case you were wondering, this is what happens when an infant is left in the care of an English teacher for the summer.

 

1 cover

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

2 Gabriel and Hobbes

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Bill, May I Call You Bill?

Dear Bill, also known as William Shakespeare,

We need to stop playing this game. You and I, we were meant to be. I’m glad you’ve finally realized it.

Thou are more lovely and more temperate. Look! We finish each others sentences!
Thou art more lovely and more temperate. Look! We finish each others sentences!

I know some people are going to look down on this post and say “Amanda, you and a 16th century playwright just can’t be, it’s simple math,” but they are wrong. Dead people don’t have Twitter accounts.

Just so you know, Bill, I’m a huge fan of your work. Now that you’re following my blog on Twitter, I can see that you’re a fan of mine, too.

Now that we both understand that we admire each other, let me tell you all the other ways we belong together. I could do it in sonnet form, but I feel that’s your area, so I won’t step on your toes.

Graffiti: Bringing Literature to the Streets

Great literature can inspire various forms of art, including the kind that paints our streets: graffiti. Graffiti is generally illegal in the United States, unless it is done in cities with walls designated for such a purpose. However, the drawings left on these walls are often painted over by other artists due to the limited space. Because it is illegal, graffiti writers often go through great lengths to leave their artwork on a public wall, often making political statements in the process.

Below are a few examples of literary graffiti around the world. Which one’s your favorite?

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Antoine de Saint-Exupéry The Little Prince