Tag Archives: Poetic Forms

Happy National Poetry Month!

That’s right – it’s April 1st! And we all know what that means. National Poetry Month has officially begun.

So let’s celebrate poetry together. Here’s three great ways to get you started in your celebrating.

1. Share a poem a day over social media! Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or whatever else you use. There are plenty of great sites out there, like Poets.Org or PoemHunter.Com, that have plenty of poems for you to choose from and share. We also have plenty of poetry posts for you to find poems to share in. You can have fun with this and make it thematic – like you can post a Shakespeare Sonnet a day, in order, or only post on social media in the form of Haikus. If you have fun with it, then your friends are going to have fun with it too.

2. Read a new poet a day! Not just a new poem, mind you, but go out there and find poets you’re not familiar with. There are many great poems and great poets out there. If you’re into American poetry or British poetry, try to go outside of the western influence and check out some work by Pablo Neruda from Chili, Li Bai from China, Matsuo Bashō from Japan, or Alexander Pushkin from Russia to get you started on your poet-a-day quest. You can also let chance play a part in your new-poet a day and sign up for Poets.Org’s poem-a-day email.

A Master of all Forms

If I know one thing for certain it is this: not one person has ever woken up one morning, said they wanted to be a writer without ever having studied or practiced writing, and cranked out the best story ever (sorry Tom Hanks) or a decent poem.

Sorry again Tom Hanks.

No, my friends, writing takes practice. One way I suggest you practice is by writing poetry, whether or not you are a poet. Poetry gives a writer great practice in conciseness, simile and metaphor, rhythm, structure, and diction choices, just to name a few. Great writers of the past like William Shakespeare, John Donne, Ben Jonson, and Andrew Marvell wrote multiple forms of poetry as a way of mastering their craft. Why not do the same?

Here are two poetic forms to get you started on your journey to master different poetic forms.

What Makes The Epic Epic

We’ve all called something epic – it’s now associated with awesome, big, spectacular – but, as a literary term, the epic means something very specific. Homer’s Iliad and The Odyssey, the unknown author’s Beowulf, Milton’s Paradise Lost, and Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself aren’t epics because they’re long pieces of poetry, but rather, because they all share a very specific elements which puts them into the epic category.

The movie Epic and epic poetry have nothing in common, I’m sorry to say.

First, epic poems open with what’s called a in medias res, Latin for “in the midst of things.” Beowulf opens with a kingdom in need of a Grendel extermination. The reader doesn’t start with the birth of Beowulf, but rather we start with a scene ripe for action.

The setting of epics are vast. Think the exact opposite of The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, which mostly takes place in one room. Epics are epic in part because of the vastness of their settings. The Odyssey spans oceans and continents, for example.

Almost all epics call to a muse to set the tone of the piece of poetry to come.

No, not those muses (I knew your brain would go there). The muses were not five gospel singers – and that’s the gospel truth.