Tag Archives: sonnets

Story Shots: Shakespeare

Story_Shots

Today, in 1616, William Shakespeare, beloved playwright and poet, passed away. For the past 399 years, Shakespeare has continued to live through his work. An author, you see, can die twice. Once is his or her actual, physical death, and the second death is when no one reads nor remembers your work any longer. While Shakespeare has died once, he has yet to experience this second death. This blog isn’t about Shakespeare’s death, but rather is about his continued life through his works.


Sonnet 74

But be contented when that fell arrest
Without all bail shall carry me away,
My life hath in this line some interest,
Which for memorial still with thee shall stay.
When thou reviewest this, thou dost review
The very part was consecrate to thee:
The earth can have but earth, which is his due;
My spirit is thine, the better part of me:
So then thou hast but lost the dregs of life,
The prey of worms, my body being dead;
The coward conquest of a wretch’s knife,
Too base of thee to be remembered.
The worth of that is that which it contains,
And that is this, and this with thee remains.

– William Shakespeare


I am a rumor – a story. I just happen to be true.

I started one day in a Shakespeare course at Cal Poly Pomona.

They were paired up – the brightest and most talkative girl in the class – big in size and personality. And he was the handsome, fit, and quiet boy – quiet because he slept through most of the class.

He had all of the lines, literally. He was Henry V and she was Catherine – his French speaking princess. Only, she didn’t speak French. But Catherine did in eight lines of the scene they were assigned.

Henry V had issues remembering his long-winded speeches. It might have been because they were so long. It was most likely because he had put off practicing them until the day of the scene.

Catherine had issues remembering how to say things in French. She tried to write the lines down on her hand, but she realized she also had issues reading French. French, overall, was the issue for the princess of France.

Henry V and Catherine, while never having practiced the scene completely through together, did have one agreement though – they would end their production of Henry V right before Henry’s line “Catherine, you have witchcraft in your lips.”

Catherine was happy with that plan. Henry V had a surprise.

This is where the rumor was born. This was how I was made.

Henry V pulled the teacher aside before class and begged to use his copy of Shakespeare’s play to remember his words.

Catherine declined and tried to read her horribly scribbled French lines off of her hand.

Henry V and Catherine both forgot about Catherine’s maid, Alice. An Alice was pulled out of the audience and stuck into the scene.

Alice didn’t know her words either nor any of the staging. She assumed there would be staging. Henry V and Catherine never really got that far.

Alice was standing between Catherine and Henry when the dreaded line was said “Catherine, you have witchcraft in your lips.”

Catherine’s eyes opened wide and a slight look of horror swept across her face as Henry pushed aside Alice and took Catherine in his arms.

Henry V pulled Catherine close. His hand touched her cheek.

His thumb found itself over her lips, so when his lips approached, they were both kissing his thumb.

The class gasped.

Catherine exhaled.

Henry V thought himself clever.

Overall, the performance was awful. The Bard was probably rolling over in his grave.

The teacher gave Henry V and Catherine a solid B.

And now everyone remembers me as that time that one girl got kissed in Dr. Aaron’s Shakespeare class.

– Amanda Riggle


So You Want to Write a Sonnet

Sonnets are a classic form of poetry which first started in Italy in the 13th century by Giacomo da Lentini. In the 16th century, Sir Thomas Wyatt pioneered the Sonnet as an English form of poetry. Sonnets are also poems that do not stand on their own. Sonnets come as part of a sequence, yet they can be read as stand-alone poetry. While all sonnets have some structural similarities, such as having fourteen lines and a set rhyme scheme, there are different kinds of sonnets with their own distinguishing features.

If you want to write a sonnet, you should understand the structural rules associated with the different forms.

The Petrarchan/Italian Sonnet

The Petrarchan, also called The Italian, sonnet is divided up into two sections – the octave and the sestet. The octave is made up of eight lines, divided in itself up into two quatrains, with the rhyme scheme of ABBA ABBA. The octave usually sets up some sort of problem or question that the speaker in the sonnet is asking. The sestet is made up of six lines, divided into two tercets, that is the volta, also known as the turn or solution to the problem or question posed in the octave. The rhyme scheme of the sestet can vary – it can either be CDE CDE, CDC CDC, CDD CDE, or CDC DCD. Other variations of the rhyme scheme of the sestet have developed over time, but these are the most common classic forms.

While Petrarch wrote his 317 sonnets in Italian, there were many English sonneteers that used the Petrarchan form in English, like The Long Love That in My Heart Doth Harbor by Sir Thomas Wyatt, a translation of Petrarch’s Rima 140.

The long love that in my heart doth harbor
And in mine heart doth keep his residence,
Into my face presseth with bold pretense,
And there campeth, displaying his banner.
She that me learneth to love and to suffer,
And wills that my trust and lust’s negligence
Be reined by reason, shame, and reverence,
With his hardiness taketh displeasure.
Wherewith love to the heart’s forest he fleeth,
Leaving his enterprise with pain and cry,
And there him hideth and not appeareth.
What may I do when my master feareth
But in the field with him to live and die?
For good is the life ending faithfully.

This sonnet follows the ABBA ABBA ryhme scheme within the octave and the CDC CDC ryhme scheme within the sestet. The topic, as is common in most sonnets, is about love. Or, to be more specific, about yearning for love because there’s some obstacle in the way. This theme of longing for love stays true within most sonnet forms.

The Shakespearean/Elizabethan Sonnet

While Shakespeare wasn’t the first Englishman to write sonnets, nor the Elizabethan form of the sonnet, he is the most celebrated practitioner of the form which also bears his namesake and wrote 154 sonnets in his lifetime. The Shakespearean and Petrarchan sonnet share some similarities, such as a set rhyme scheme (though that scheme varies between the two forms), the number of lines, the presence of a volta, and the theme of longing love, but there are many differences between the two forms as well.

The Shakespearean sonnet also has a set meter called iambic pentameter. Iambic pentameter consists of five feet. These feet are made up of two sets of syllables – the first unstressed and the second stressed. And, because English, as a language, does not have as many rhymes as a Romance-based language like Italian, the rhyme scheme was also restructured to be ABAB CDCD EFEF GG. The division of the sonnet was also reconstructed to be three sets of quatrains with one volta occurring in the last two lines of the poem, so the shift or answer in the poem comes much later than it does in a Petrarchan sonnet.

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 demonstrates the rhyme scheme and meter of the Shakespearean sonnet.

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date;
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

While this poem is less about yearning for love, the speaker in the poem still demonstrates a yearning, but this yearning is to preserve the object of their love past what is natural.

The Spenserian Sonnet

A Literary Theme Park

For all of us book-lovers out there, Boston’s latest amusement park was literally made just for us. What am I talking about? Well, Boston is building a tourism industry around its literary history, hoping to attract tourists. This also includes a literature theme park.

This has been a dream of mine since high school – I’ve even written papers on it. Although, I should probably mention, my high school literary theme park was based on Dante’s Inferno‘s levels of hell.

These rides would probably not be that fun.

As long as Boston doesn’t create any Dante-based rides, as I did, I think this theme park would be a great place for the whole family. I can just picture the rides now:

Shakespeare Compliments

A few days ago, Buzzfeed.Com posted an article (do we call those things articles? I’ve heard the term listicle thrown around, but that doesn’t do it justice either. It’s just a page full of animated gifs with very limited words and no critical analysis. I digress…) titled 15 Shakespearean Insults to Replace Your Boring Ones and have also put together other similar articles like 17 Shakespearean Insults to Unleash In Everyday Life.

(Credit: Buzzfeed.Com)

So, Buzzfeed.Com, what’s up with all of this negativity? Shakespeare did more than just insult people. Shakespeare was a poet as well as a playwright and often wrote poems praising the person within the poem with some pretty and nice language. Shakespeare was good at complimenting people, too.

Here are some of my favorite Shakespearean compliments.

I Would Totally Take my Panties off For The Right Poem, Part 2

Well, it’s time for Part 2 of my poetry-as-a-form-of-seduction explorations. Today, we go to one of my favorite writers and take a closer look at his skills of seduction – William Shakespeare.

That’s right, it’s time to go Shakespeare.

While Shakespeare is a famous playwright, he is also a famous poet, writing over 154 sonnets as well as other poems.

Thought to be the only portrait of Shakespeare painted during his lifetime, which depicts him in his mid 40's. Not too bad.
Thought to be the most accurate portrait of Shakespeare painted during his lifetime, which depicts him in his mid 40’s. Not too bad.

Right off the bat, before we even get to the poem, I’m going to admit some bias here in that I adore Shakespeare and I like smart dudes. I feel that, to write the way he did, Shakespeare was probably pretty darn smart.

But I’m going to have to set my biased aside and try and judge the Bard (also called The Bard of Avon and the Swan of Avon) on his words.

While the sonnet I chose to look at is part of a sequence of sonnets, each sonnet in that sequence also stands alone as a piece of poetic work. I decided to look at Sonnet 130 for today’s seduction analysis.