Tag Archives: Summer Reading

Summer 2017 Reading List

Summer officially arrives on June 20th, but I like to plan ahead. With college now two years behind me (yikes!), I’ve finally remembered what it feels like to read for pleasure. Not because my professor said so, or, you know, because the book has their name on it. The act of it feels like being reunited with an old friend—we’ve picked up right where we left off. I have a lot of reading to catch up on, and there’s no better time to do so than summer. Here are the books on my summer 2017 reading list.

 

Lucky Boy

Author: Shanthi Sekaran
Publisher: G.P. Putnam’s Sons
Release Date: January 10, 2017

Solimar (Soli) Castro Valdez is eighteen when she leaves Oaxaca, crossing the US/Mexican border and landing on her cousin’s doorstep in Berkeley, California. Silvia, her cousin, is a housekeeper for the well-to-do Cassidy family. By the time Soli arrives, she’s also pregnant. While motherhood wasn’t the plan, her baby boy, nicknamed “Nacho,” keeps Soli grounded in this foreign world. When she is arrested and detained, Nacho falls into the custody of the foster system and, inevitably, under the care of Kavya Reddy and her husband, Rishi.

Kavya is a chef at a UC Berkeley sorority house. In her mid-thirties, she’s unexpectedly beginning to feel the pull of motherhood. When fulfilling this desire proves to be more challenging than she expected,
it takes a strain on her marriage. With Nacho suddenly thrust into Kavya’s life, she attempts to become the mother she always dreamed of being, even if that identity is wrapped up together with someone else’s child.

An emotional journey, there are no villains in this story, and there are no heroes. Sekaran gives a human face to the timely topic of illegal immigration.


Fever Dream

Author: Samanta Schweblin
Publisher: Riverhead Books
Release Date: January 10, 2017

Schweblin’s novel is difficult to describe. Translated from Spanish into English by Megan McDowell, Fever Dream is a story of a young mother, Amanda, dying in a rural hospital, and the young boy, David, sitting by her side. Together, they attempt to weave together the events that led to Amanda’s illness, and the result is a haunting, dream-like narrative “where souls shift from sick bodies to healthy hosts and poisonous toxins seep under the skin upon contact with the grass.” And while David is not Amanda’s son, the two have met before.

At their vacation home, Amanda and her daughter, Nina, encountered David’s mother, Carla, spinning tales of her son on more than one occasion. Their eventual, frightening introduction causes Amanda to throw Carla and David out of her home. Not too long after, the three women meet again. In her hospital bed, Amanda tries to put the fragments of her memories back together, how that reunion led her down this path. Readers will begin to question how reliable a narrator Amanda actually is.

Bookish Beach Towels for Summer

World Domination for Cats Beach Towel available on Society6

Summer may not officially kick off until June 20th, but here in California, the weather is already providing an excuse to throw on a swimsuit and head down to the water. It’s also giving me an excuse to search for bookish beach towels to bring along with me, like the one above (cats are jerks, so it only makes sense that they’re secretly plotting world domination).

Below you can find some more of my favorites.

 

Another Quiet Spot Beach Towel available on Society6
Another Quiet Spot Beach Towel

 

It’s story time in this dark forest, where a friendly monster and cute bunny find a quiet spot to read. I love the soft, muted colors and imagery in this print.

 

Book Dinosaurs Beach Towel available on Society6
Book Dinosaurs Beach Towel

 

Anyone who knows me can tell you my favorite movie is Jurassic Park (the book, though quite different, is great too), and as such, I’ve always been fascinated with dinosaurs. On this beach towel, the artist has combined dinosaurs and books. I love the fact that the dinosaurs aren’t only reading them, they’re made of them—their bony armor replaced with colorful books.

Summer Reading for Children: A Great Time to Build Empathy

School’s out! And that means that hordes of children (they come in hordes, right?) will be running free for the eight (or more) hours a day they used to spend in school.

There are lots of things to do with kids at this time. You can send them away to camp, if you can afford it, or enroll them in some day camps in your area that have them do arts and crafts. The older kids can get jobs, and the younger kids can be those babysitting jobs the older kids get.

I know on my summer break, coming from a socioeconomically deprived family, I never experienced any sort of children’s camp myself. Instead, I watched a lot of T.V. and read a lot of books. One of those was probably better for me than the other.

A recent study came out that found that reading helps build empathy. This isn’t anything new to us humanities majors and graduates, but this study by Stanford University tested that hypothesis and gave quantifiable evidence to what was a qualitative observation.

One great service we can do for our hordes of children is to help them build empathy. Empathy is not only the ability to recognize, respect, and reciprocate the emotions of others, but it’s what psychologists call a “pro-social” behavior that helps our society, overall, because a society that cares for and about each other is the way a society is supposed to function. Just look at the roots of the word: soci, Latin for us, partner, or comrade and ity, a Latin suffix that is used to abstract nouns to express a state or condition. So, by that breakdown of the word, society is the state of being us – partners or comrades.

There are many great books out there that will help kids build empathy. What I’m listing today would be great for 8-12 year old kids. Instead of watching strange things on YouTube (which is what my 9 year old Godchild does constantly) or Netflixing (yes, it’s a verb now), kids can pick up these books (hopefully willingly, but if not, bribery is always an option) and build their empathy skills up instead.

Freak the Mighty

I remember reading this book in either the fourth or fifth grade, and it made me cry. This book is the story of two boys – one, a slow learning giant and one, an extremely bright child in leg braces. These boys become unlikely friends, and, well, darn it. I’m going to tear up again. This book shows the power of unlikely friendships and the value we each have as a person – big, strong, and slow or small, weak, and smart as well as everyone in the middle.

Quick Bits of Literature

Literature doesn’t just come in giant, dusty tomes. It’s not that I have anything against giant, dusty tomes. Those are actually some of my favorite types of tomes, but not all of my favorite literature is a few hundred pages long. Some of my favorite pieces of literature actually come in the form of short stories.

To get your summer started out right, I thought I’d compile a list of some of my favorite literary short stories. If you want to become more familiar with literature, or you just want some good, short things to read this summer, start here!

What You Pawn I Will Redeem by Sherman Alexie has long been a favorite short story of mine. This story explores the life of a homeless Native American and chronicles his adventures of trying to recover his grandmother’s regalia. I know that sounds like it could be sad or dark, but it’s actually really funny and gives great insight into the perceptions and attitudes of those mainstream society marginalizes.

Happy Endings by Margaret Atwood is a story I use all the time with my students. This not only tells a great story, but teaches readers and writers alike what goes into telling a good story and how the ending, well, you’ll see once you get to the end.