Tag Archives: Twelfth Night

400 Years After Shakespeare’s Death

The Cobbe Portrait, William Shakespeare

On April 23rd, 1616, it is believed that William Shakespeare passed away. While we don’t have records of his death, we do have records of his funeral which occurred two days later on April 25th, 1616.

At the age of 52, Shakespeare left behind a body of work that has captivated pop culture and has been the favored subject of academia (think of your high school literature classes) for the past 400 years. Shakespeare’s works have lead to an unparalleled phenomenon across cultures and well past his time.

This blog has continually looked for Shakespeare from searching for Shakespeare in bookstores in Taipei, Taiwan to visiting a bookstore with his namesake in Berkeley, California. Speaking of books, we’ve reviewed the Star Wars Shakespeare-style books, have shared our own stories about Shakespeare, and have made so many freaking posts about Shakespeare loot it’s kinda ridiculous.

Literary Paraphernalia: Shakespeare Home Decor

To continue with our celebration of The Swan of Avon, I’ve found some really cool items to turn your ordinary, 21st century home into a Shakespeare extravaganza. It’s not quiet like The Globe, but hey, what in life is like The Globe?

Hamlet Mixed Media Print

Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio, a fellow of infinite nest, of most excellent fancy bird hats.

Lady Macbeth Soap Dispenser

You too can feel like a murderess cleaning her hands of her sins every time you go to wash your hands.

The Tempest Poster

Take a leap and stick this bold poster inspired by The Tempest up on your wall and see what devils come to play in your life.

As You Like It Stained Glass

This stained glass quote would look cool in any window or hanging out in a garden – wherever you may like it.

Teaching Shakespeare? Check Out These Three Common Core Lesson Plans.

Last year I started an undergraduate research project titled Integrating Technology into the California Common Core Performance Classroom. From inception to completion the project took me a year, but I am very happy with the results. Here’s the abstract to get a taste of what my research was on:

In 2010, President Barack Obama set forth a plan called “Transforming American Education: Learning Powered by Technology” which mandated that technology needed to be integrated into American classrooms to enhance student learning (Ash). The need for technology in the classroom is not only government endorsed but helps improve students’ familiarity with the use of technology in a future job market that is becoming globalized and technology-driven (Ehrlich). In 2013, the Los Angeles Unified School District spent one billion dollars to distribute Apple iPads to over 47 schools in an effort to comply with the directives set forth through President Obama’s plan and ended up recalling the iPads in under a week due to the operating system being hacked (“L.A. Unified”). The purpose of this project is to find ways of meeting the 2010 mandated use of technology within a performance-based classroom teaching Shakespeare by creating learning opportunities in which technology can be incorporated into the classroom through the use of student-generated content. Through examination of other successful classroom models incorporating technology, looking ahead at some proposed, yet still controversial, technology-driven classroom models, utilizing performance approaches to teaching Shakespeare, and studying the new Common Core standards being implemented in K-12 schools throughout the nation, a hybrid of technology and the study of 16th century Shakespearean plays can be successfully implemented in a Common Core classroom.

You Might have Quoted Shakespeare Today

Shakespeare was more than just a wordsmith–he was also the inventor of many idiomatic expressions we commonly use today. Some of his most popular phrases that most people will recognize as his work are “green eyed monster,” “a plague on both your houses,” “a horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse,” “Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him well, Horatio,” and so on. But there are many more idioms he coined that we use everyday that you might not recognize as Shakespeare’s work.

“As cold as any stone”
From King Henry V

This idiom is used generally to describe someone as being unfeeling, but in Henry V the phrase was used to describe the feeling of a dead man lying in bed.

“As merry as the day is long”
From Much Ado About Nothing and King John

This idiom is used to express being happy and Shakespeare used it in the same fashion, although usually in a negative comparison to actions other characters had taken. I could have been as merry as the day is long if you hadn’t done something stupid is the modern equivalent to how Shakespeare used this phrase.

“As good luck would have it”
From The Merry Wives of Windsor

I almost don’t need to describe this one. It just means that you’ve run into a bought of good luck, just as Falstaff had in The Merry Wives of Windsor.